Research & Reports

Climate Solutions that Work: Bringing Community Benefits and Climate Action Together

In partnership with Social Planning Toronto and the CEE Centre for Young Black Professionals, the Toronto Environmental Alliance (TEA) has just released a new report that identifies best practices for leveraging investments in climate actions to create a range of community benefits.

Central Etobicoke Hub Feasibility Study

Using multiple sources of data, the Central Etobicoke Hub Feasibility Study provides an in-depth understanding of the current deficits in community services and community spaces in Central Etobicoke and accesses the feasibility of a community hub as an important step to addressing some of these deficits. The report identifies, assesses, and prioritizes community needs; identifies community assets and resources; identifies walkability and transit issues that affect access; outlines demographic information; captures the unique needs of the area; identifies accessible locations for community space; records specific areas of interest and programming needs; establishes potential partnerships and identifies potential governance models. The study builds on the preliminary work of various community groups, with members who have been raising awareness around the lack of services and the deficits in community spaces in Central Etobicoke since the 1990s.

Promises, Promises: City Council Commitments & The 2018 Budget

Social Planning Toronto’s budget brief, Promises, Promises, documents the systematic underfunding of key council-approved strategies and service plans in the 2018 city budget. Social Planning Toronto analysis indicates that to meet the commitments council has made, this budget would require:

  • an increased investment of $36 million in the 2018 city operating budget;
  • an additional $35 million to double council’s commitment to new affordable rental housing development;
  • a revision of the city’s budget process to ensure transparency and accountability on critical issues affecting Toronto.

The report presents funding options to support council-approved strategies and service plans.

Inclusionary Zoning: Evidence and Implications for Ontario

In December 2016, the Province of Ontario introduced legislation that will allow municipalities to enact inclusionary zoning (IZ) as part of a broader plan to increase the stock of affordable housing. This was welcome news for many who have called for inclusionary zoning as part of the solution to Ontario’s affordable housing crisis.

Unequal City: The Hidden Divide Among Toronto’s Children and Youth

This report draws on the Statistics Canada 2016 Census and other new data sources to describe the level, distribution and depth of poverty among Toronto children, youth and their families.

New data shows Ontario’s imminent Labour Reforms will benefit working millennials, women.

New reports released today by Social Planning Toronto show that younger Torontonians, as well as women in key sectors will benefit from proposed labour law reforms under the Ontario government’s Bill 148, The Fair Workplaces, Better Jobs Act. However, the proposed legislation leaves out the majority of precarious workers, including women and millennials, from improved access to unions.

Newcomer Youth Recreation Forum Report

Despite the many benefits of recreation in health and in settlement, newcomer youth have much lower participation rates compared to their peers. On Monday, June 12, 2017, more than 120 young people, service providers, volunteers, and elected officials gathered at Toronto City Hall to explore ways to improve access to recreation for newcomer youth. Below is a summary of the afternoon and themes that emerged.

Still Streamed: How High Impact Decisions Are Shaping Students’ Futures

Across Ontario, grade 8 students are required to register for high school courses which are classified into three levels: academic, applied, and locally developed/essentials. Typically, students take the majority of their courses at the same level, constituting a stream or pathway. Not only do these decisions impact students’ educational pathways through high school, they can have significant bearing on their post-secondary and career options.

While our education system strives to level the playing field for marginalized students, children of colour and lower income students are over-represented in lower streams which can limit their future opportunities and may not reflect their goals or potential.

Central Etobicoke Hub Preliminary Report

Central Etobicoke is a large geographic area composed primarily of wards 3 and 4, located in the west-end of Toronto. The boundaries stretch north to the 401, south to Burnamthorpe Road (with some parts reaching Dundas), west to include Centennial park and east just beyond Royal York Road. The area includes smaller neighbourhoods like The West Mall, the East Mall, Kingsview village, Mabelle, Scarlettwood court, Willowridge and Capri.

Historically central Etobicoke has been perceived as a well-to-do middle-class community. However, the City of Toronto is seeing major changes in its socio-economic geography. According to University of Toronto Professor David Hulchanski’s 2010 study: The Three Cities within Toronto: Income Polarization Among Toronto’s Neighbourhoods, this transformation entails high levels of wealth emerging increasingly in the downtown core and increasing pockets of low-income in the surrounding inner suburbs1. Hulchanski states that many smaller communities have become parts of “City three” — areas where income levels have decreased 20% or more since the 1970’s.

Demographic Change In Toronto’s Neighbourhoods: Meeting community needs across the life span

Throughout 2017, Social Planning Toronto will be producing a series of reports highlighting newly released 2016 Census data from Statistics Canada and its significance for Toronto and its communities. Our first report, Growth and Change in Toronto’s Neighbourhoods, released in February focused on population growth and density in Toronto over the past five years and the implications for creating inclusive communities across the city. Demographic Change in Toronto’s Neighbourhoods looks at the shifting age and sex makeup of Toronto and what it means for the programs, services and priorities of the city. 

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